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Unfortunately, a friend of mine told me this week that her toddler daughter sustained a tibial fracture. She said that she came down a slide with her daughter on her lap, which, most parents I know, myself included, have done multiple times. While they were coming down, her daughter’s foot got stuck on the side of the slide and she let out a loud shriek. Since then, her daughter has not been able to bear weight on her leg. My friend took her daughter to a hospital where she was diagnosed with a non-displaced tibial fracture.

Apparently this is not such a rare occurrence and an article on just this topic was published less than a month ago in the Journal of Pediatric Orthopedics, titled “Tibia Fractures in Children Sustained on a Playground Slide.” The article is a retrospective study by Dr. John T. Gaffney, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon in Mineola, NY, who looked at 58 patients with tibial fractures and focused on the 8 cases which all happened while playing on a slide. The age of those 8 children ranged from 14-32 months and in ALL of the cases the child suffered a fracture while going down the slide on an adult’s lap. It appears that the injury happens when a child’s foot gets stuck on the side of the slide and because the parent’s speed and momentum makes it difficult to stop, this results in a tibial fracture for the child. The study recommends that if a child cannot safely go down a slide on their own, they should be redirected to a different activity to maximize the child’s safety.

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Fall Kids Fest in Madison Square Park

Posted by Alina on Wednesday Oct 14, 2009 Under useful tips

This coming weekend, October 17th, 2009, Madison Square Park will be hosting the Fall Kids Fest from 10:30am-1:30pm with live music, arts and crafts, face painting, snacks, a costume parade lead by clowns, and much much more. This is the second year that it is being held.

I went with my husband and son last year and although it was quite crowded, and our son was a bit too young to enjoy it all, it was still fun to witness the ongoing events and see all the adorable little kids dressed up in their Halloween costumes.

For more information, here is an article about it from Time Out Kids, which is a partner in providing this fun filled event.

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Infant Massage

Posted by Alina on Wednesday Oct 7, 2009 Under health, useful tips

I was recently contacted by an expert in the field of infant and children’s massage therapy, Tina Allen, LMT, CPMMT, CPMT, CIMT, who will be in NYC on October 17 & 18, 2009 Saturday & Sunday to present a workshop at the St. Mary’s Children’s Hospital. During the course she is offering free infant massage lessons for families from 1:30-2:30pm. For further information please check out her website www.liddlekidz.com. You must RSVP to newyork-training@liddlekidz.com if you are interested in participating in this event. Ms. Allen says ” Babies and children simply love to be touched. In fact, they thrive on it and it is a crucial part of their development.” She was kind enough to share some of her massage tips with BigAppleMom.com readers:

Getting Ready:
– Make sure the room is warm enough (especially if removing the child’s clothing)
– Relax yourself
– Warm your hands by rubbing them together
– Ask permission to start massage by making eye contact and verbally asking out loud “Is it okay if I give you a massage?”

Massage Time:
The Legs
If your little one is laying down facing you,
– Start by placing your warmed hands around the top of baby’s leg at the hip
– Cupping one leg, gently stroke downward towards the foot
– Do not put any pressure on baby’s knee or ankle
– Then stroke the bottom of the foot and gently hug each little toe
– Next kiss the feet, babies love this!
– Repeat on the opposite leg.

The Tummy
The tummy should not be massaged right after eating. If baby has not recently eaten (within 30 minutes), introduce your touch to the belly.
– Place your hands at the belly button and move them in a clockwise motion
– This movement can help ease the pains associated with gas, constipation and has been known to ease colic

The Arms
– Repeat the same soothing strokes that we used on the legs

The Back
– Stroke the back, starting at the shoulders, over bum and down the legs, showing extra care not to put any pressure on her spine
– Continue stroking the back a few times
End with a hug and kiss!

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